November 14-16, 2017
Boston, MA

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Day One
Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Day Two
Thursday, November 16, 2017

08.00
Breakfast & Registration

09.00
Chair’s Opening Remarks

Neoantigen Targeting for Enhanced Efficacy

09.30
Neoantigens as Targets in Oncology: A Compelling Case

Synopsis

  • The clinical data so far regarding neoantigens in solid tumors
  • The challenge of identifying neoantigens – understanding their role and importance
  • The arsenal being developed to explore their suitability as targets to enhance response rates

10.00
Targets Matter: What Decides a Peptide is an Antigen? Software or the Patient’s T Cells?

Synopsis

  • The ATLAS technology detects bona fide antigens, without predictions, by screening a patient’s peripheral blood T cells with their tumor-specific mutations presented by autologous dendritic cells
  • ATLAS-identified antigens have limited overlap with those identified by in silico methods
  • The patient’s entire mutanome can be interrogated for antigen activity
  • Neoantigens that induce either CD4+ or CD8+ T cell responses (or both) are identified
  • Neoantigens can be classified as stimulatory or inhibitory modulators of T cell activity

10.30
Morning Refreshments & Speed Networking

Improving Methods for Neoantigen Identification

11.30
NGS Solutions for Immunonocolgy

  • John Simmons Director, Translational Science & Diagnostics, PGDx

Synopsis

  • At Personal Genome Diagnostics (PGDx), our immunoncology product portfolio centers on the development of custom assays in both tissue and plasma to facilitate co-development of relevant immunotherapies
  • We have the capabilities to refine our custom panels and adapt them for use in clinical trials for both prospective enrollment and retrospective analysis
  • Ultimately, these panels can be clinically and analytically validated for FDA submission as in vitro diagnostics (IVDs). Our assays accurately predict tumor mutational burden, determine microsatellite status and identify a range of mutations in genes involved in immune signaling In addition, we have leveraged highly accurate cancer whole exome analyses from FFPE tumor tissue with a state-of-the-art analysis protocol to identify and prioritize candidate neoantigens most likely to promote an immune response
  • Our technology effectively and accurately enables personalized cancer vaccine development, adoptive T-cell transfer, and predicts response to checkpoint inhibitors

12.00
Open Source Tools and Models for Neoantigen Prediction

  • John Simmons Director, Translational Science & Diagnostics, PGDx

Synopsis

  • The ATLAS technology detects bona fide antigens, without predictions, by screening a patient’s peripheral blood T cells with their tumor-specific mutations presented by autologous dendritic cells
  • ATLAS-identified antigens have limited overlap with those identified by in silico methods
  • The patient’s entire mutanome can be interrogated for antigen activity
  • Neoantigens that induce either CD4+ or CD8+ T cell responses (or both) are identified
  • Neoantigens can be classified as stimulatory or inhibitory modulators of T cell activity

13.00
Accelerating the Development of Personalized Cancer Immunotherapy: Mass Spectrometry based Immunopeptidomics

Synopsis

  • Advanced biochemical extraction and mass-spectrometry analysis for identification and validation of cancer antigens (HLA binding peptides) from cancer tissues
  • Immunopeptidomics in combination with genomics for identification of clinically relevant neo-antigens
  • Prioritization of tumour antigens for personalized vaccines

13.00
Lunch Networking

Neoantigen Prioritization & Immune Monitoring to Ensure Selection of Most Potent Neoantigens

14.30
Discovering Real Neoantigens through the XPRESIDENT® Mass Spectrometry Platform

Synopsis

  • Introduction to Immatics’ XPRESIDENT® mass spectrometry-based target discovery and validation platform
  • Pitfalls in “classical” neoantigen discovery through in silico methods: sorting out false-positive candidates and identifying real, naturally presented neoantigens from primary tumor tissue
  • Data from Immatics’ actively personalized immunotherapy clinical trials

15.00
From Sample to Neoantigens for Vaccines: Key Challenges and Solutions

Synopsis

  • cfDNA neoantigens: dealing with tumor heterogeneity
  • Improving neoantigen identification
  • Elaborating TME, immuno-modulators and vaccine response biomarkers
  • Overcoming poor sample quality and quantity for NGS sequencing
  • Overcoming sequencing gaps that can harbor neoantigens
  • Validation and regulatory issues on the way to commercialization

15.30
Targeting the Broad Spectrum of Patient-Specific Tumor Neoantigens without the Need to Identify Them

15.30
Afternoon Refreshments & Networking

16.00
Neoantigens Recognized by T cells with TCR Cross Reactivity

  • Rongfu Wang Director, Center for Inflammation & Epigenetics , Weill Cornell Medical College

Synopsis

  • Cost of validation of neoantigens vs. time taken to find the most potent neoantigen
  • Understanding which of the neoantigens is reactive towards the tumor
  • How can you ensure robust tumor rejection?
  • How do you ensure your therapy correlates to the T cell response?

17.00
Personalized Liquid Biopsy and its Biopharma Applications

Synopsis

  • Natera is a leader in non-invasive testing of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in the blood, and has run more than a million cfDNA tests
  • We recently introduced SignateraTM, a novel circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) technology that analyzes and tracks mutations specific to an individual’s tumor (“tumor signatures”)
  • It has demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity for ctDNA detection and monitoring, and has the potential to measure treatment response, detect residual disease, and identify recurrence in research

17.30
Neoantigens as Prognostic and Diagnostic Tools

Synopsis

  • Understanding which patients might be responsive to a particular delivery approach
  • Identifying potential changes in the mutational repertoire to serve as biomarkers for immunotherapy
  • Identifying markers that can be useful to identify neoantigen reactive T cells in a non evasive approach
  • Utilizing neoantigens for patient stratification and the identification of biomarkers

18.00
Chairman’s Closing Remarks

18.15
Close of Day 1